3 Pros and Cons to Bringing a Resume to an Interview

So you’ve landed an interview, congratulations! Now on to the little details, such as, to bring resumes or to not bring resumes. Here are 3 pros and cons to consider when you make your decision:

Pros:

  1. Like a test, the answers to your experiences are right in front of you. You are able to reference the resume when you are speaking
  2. You appear very prepared. We suggest that you bring 5-7 resumes (unless you know you will be meeting with more people). Bring your resumes to pass out. Often employers don’t know your resumes as well as you do and forget what they read. It will alleviate their need to remember if you supply them with your resume
  3. Letting the employer have copies on deck may enable them to keep you on deck for the next position (if you don’t get the current spot). Many times, employment has to do with being at the right place and right time. Same with your resume. If your employer has one hanging around, he or she may remember you better for new opportunities

Cons:

  1. You may rely too heavily on your resume. If you’ve ever had a speech class, you know the feeling of reading from a script versus being very prepared and not needing one at all. Just like that, having a resume may be too much of a crutch for you
  2. The conversation isn’t as fluid. Now and days, interviews are very much like conversations. The employer wants to gauge how you would be on a day to day chat. If you’re reading from your resume, your employer might not be able to gauge as well. You might not be able to act as naturally either.
  3.  Wasting paper. We’ve all been there. Printing too many copies of something we never touch again. Be mindful to not print too many copies.

Pro tip: If you arrive and there are more people than you have, ask for their emails. Let them know you will email them a copy of your resume as soon as you leave. Also, having their email addresses is a bonus for thank you emails later!

The answer isn’t as black or white. It heavily depends on the job, your experience, and comfort levels. Regardless of which route you take, remember the outcome and learn from it. Perhaps next time you won’t bring one because you found yourself relying too heavily on it. Or you will bring one because the employer forgot your work history. Good luck to you!